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MidMo.US produces, publishes, and distributes fine electronic books. Please see the “releases” page for download links and our current catalog. Check back soon for more releases.

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Back to the Garden: Epicurus and the Happy Life, by John Trapp. Download from the “releases” page.

Epicurus on

Pleasure

(Exerpted from Epicurus’ Letter to Menoeceus, full letter in Back to the Garden) When we say, then, that pleasure is the end and aim, we do not mean the pleasures of the prodigal or the pleasures of sensuality, as we are understood to do by some through ignorance, prejudice, or wilful misrepresentation. By pleasure we mean the absence of pain in the body and of trouble in the soul. It is not an unbroken succession of drinking-bouts and of revelry, not sexual love, not the enjoyment of the fish and other delicacies of a luxurious table, which produce a pleasant life; it is sober reasoning, searching out the grounds of every choice and avoidance, and banishing those beliefs through which the greatest tumults take possession of the soul. Of all this the beginning and the greatest good is prudence. Wherefore prudence is a more precious thing even than philosophy; from it spring all the other virtues, for it teaches that we cannot lead a life of pleasure which is not also a life of prudence, honour, and justice; nor lead a life of prudence, honour, and justice, which is not also a life of pleasure. For the virtues have grown into one with a pleasant life, and a pleasant life is inseparable from them.
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I  have never wished to cater to the crowd; for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know. --Epicurus

Welcome

MidMo.US produces, publishes, and distributes fine electronic books. Please see the “releases” page for download links and our current catalog. Check back soon for more releases.

Out Now!

Back to the Garden: Epicurus and the Happy Life, by John Trapp. Download from the “releases page.

Epicurus on Pleasure

(Exerpted from Epicurus’ Letter to Menoeceus, full letter in Back to the Garden) When we say, then, that pleasure is the end and aim, we do not mean the pleasures of the prodigal or the pleasures of sensuality, as we are understood to do by some through ignorance, prejudice, or wilful misrepresentation. By pleasure we mean the absence of pain in the body and of trouble in the soul. It is not an unbroken succession of drinking-bouts and of revelry, not sexual love, not the enjoyment of the fish and other delicacies of a luxurious table, which produce a pleasant life; it is sober reasoning, searching out the grounds of every choice and avoidance, and banishing those beliefs through which the greatest tumults take possession of the soul. Of all this the beginning and the greatest good is prudence. Wherefore prudence is a more precious thing even than philosophy; from it spring all the other virtues, for it teaches that we cannot lead a life of pleasure which is not also a life of prudence, honour, and justice; nor lead a life of prudence, honour, and justice, which is not also a life of pleasure. For the virtues have grown into one with a pleasant life, and a pleasant life is inseparable from them.
Cookies are used for navigation and analytics only.
I  have never wished to cater to the crowd; for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know. --Epicurus